• 188 8th Avenue
  • New York, NY 10011
  • +1 855 589 3937
THE JOURNAL WHISKEY WITH
THE BLIND BARBER
WORDS BY JANE WILDE + PRODUCED BY TINA CATHERINE | JACK CEARNAL

Barber shops have long been the meeting place and social scene for men for over decades. Although they were mostly prominent in the early decades of the 20th century, barber shops were surprisingly popular during the ages dating back to ancient times. In fact, in Ancient Greece, barber shops were the headquarters for political, social and sporting news; a place where philosophers, statesmen and even poets gathered to get their beards and hair trimmed all the while discussing and sometimes arguing over events and news in the city.

 

The golden age for barber shops was from the 1880′s to 1940′s, when men liked to socialize in male-only hangouts. It was a weekly, even daily habit for men to visit their barbershop, not only for a shave or a haircut, but to also fraternize with friends, and strangers. When envisioning a barber shop, unique design and decor may not be the first things to come to mind. Yet during their golden age, barber shops were tasteful and classy places, with stunning decor: marble counters, carved barber chairs from oak and walnut, leather upholstery, even crystal chandeliers hanging from elaborately painted ceilings. Despite these luxurious surroundings, the shops consistently offered a sense of hominess and familiarity. It was a place a man was able to relax, have great conversation with different types of people, and of course, get a clean shave or cut.

 

It is based on all of this and more, that three young guys from NYC founded the very-talked about barber shop, The Blind Barber. With locations in New York and L.A., Jeff Laub, Joshua Boyd and Adam Kirsch, came up with this “cutting-edge idea” to create a barbershop reminiscent of the early 20th century, pairing shaves and cuts with cocktails and drinks. The shop has the classic look of an old-time barber shop, with a glass-front, striped pole and mirrored wall. The design is simple and clean, yet still homey and welcoming. In the back and through a doorway, is the lounge area, with a stunning bronze bar, dark wood and black and white photographs mounting the walls surrounding it, making it an even warmer and more inviting place no gentleman can resist.

 

The conception of Blind Barber stemmed from the desire to bring the barbershop back to its roots: a meeting place for men from all walks of life, to socialize, kick back and get groomed. With this in mind, the trio decided to add another interesting element: being able to do all of that and enjoy a handcrafted drink from their bar, making it a gentlemen-only social club for the 21st century.

 

The Blind Barber is not merely a barbershop offering a drink, likened to the spas women attend that offer a tea or coffee with a pedicure: it is a place where experienced barbers carefully give you a great shave or cut, where friends can hang out and share a laugh, enjoying great drinks and great conversation. It is a true illustration of authentic service, timeless style, all with a modern edge.

Upon meeting the great minds behind Blind Barber at the Project show in NYC this past winter, our team at TCEO instantly appreciated the concept and the driving forces behind it, seeing as the culture and values Blind Barber aimed to promote were directly aligned with all that we are about: authenticity, innovation and familiarity. Just like TCEO, these three young men from NYC decided to pursue an idea and offer a service unlike any other, for reasons of hard-work and the love of doing something great and different.

 

In light of all this, we decided to interview one of the founders of the Blind Barber, Adam Kirsch in order to get a more personal viewpoint of the concept behind the Blind Barber.

 

Take a look…